Tim Mitchell
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Building Bullet-Resistant SSIS Packages

Among the training courses I offer, this is one of the most popular. This course is an adaptation and expansion of a session I delivered at the SQL PASS Summit in 2014, and was ranked as one of the top 10 sessions (out of approximately 200) at the event. Using that session as a starting point, I have built a half-day course outlining a series of best practices for building robust and error-resistant SSIS packages.

Building Bullet-Resistant SSIS Packages (4 hour course)

Building Bullet-Resistant SSIS Packages

Building Bullet-Resistant SSIS Packages

It’s 2:30 a.m., and you’ve just gotten that call no ETL developer wants to get: an SSIS package has failed unexpectedly, and nobody knows why. Immediately, you start asking yourself: “What could have caused this?”, “What do I do to fix the data from this failed execution?”, and, most importantly, “Could I design the package in such a way that this doesn’t happen again?”

In this demo-packed half-day course, I will discuss and demonstrate the design patterns and logistics of building bullet-resistant SSIS packages. I’ll show the types of things that can and will go wrong during package execution, and will demonstrate way to mitigate those risks.

Starting with the control flow, we’ll work through various tools and patterns that can be used to prevent, or at least handle appropriately, task-level errors. We’ll then move to the data flow, and discuss and demonstrate how to proactively address problem data to prevent unexpected package failures.

Although no ETL process (or, in fact, any technical process at all) can be entirely bulletproof. However, by using the design patterns I’ll show in this course, you can create packages that are less prone to failure and that are better prepared to handle failures when they do occur.

This class is ideally suited for data professionals with some prior experience in SSIS. By the end of this course, attendees will have a better understanding of the possible failure points of an SSIS packages, and some specific ways of preventing, handling, and logging those events.

The course Building Bullet-Resistant SSIS Packages is available via onsite delivery at your company, or occasionally as a public class. Public classes will be announced in advance on my blog and in my newsletter..