Tim Mitchell
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SSIS

SSIS Design Patterns

“It’s Alive” – SSIS Design Patterns

I’m happy to announce that the book I’ve been working on for the past two years, SSIS Design Patterns, is complete and has been released for sale as of today.  I got the unique privilege to work alongside SSIS rock stars Andy Leonard, Jessica Moss, Matt Masson, and Michelle Ufford to scribe what will hopefully be a must-have book for…


The Winter 2011 Colorado SQL Tour

During my visit to Denver last September for SQL Saturday 52, I spent a while talking with Marc Beacom, who mentioned that the 3 PASS chapters in and around Denver hold their monthly meetings on consecutive nights.  When I brought up my love for snowskiing, he suggested that we combine a ski trip with a speaking trip.  Thus began the…


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Presenting at PASS AppDev Virtual Chapter

Join me next Tuesday, December 14th at 11:00am CST as I present a webcast on behalf of the PASS AppDev Virtual Chapter.  I’ll be presenting “Dynamic SSIS with Expressions and Configurations”, where I show you how to remove static elements (such as connection strings, file names, and other transient values) from your packages and placing them in easier-to-administer configurations or…


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SSIS: Conditional File Processing in a ForEach Loop

I’ve fielded a number of requests recently asking how to interrogate a file within SSIS and change the processing rules based on the metadata of said file.  A recent forum poster specifically asked about using the foreach loop to iterate through the files in a directory and, on a per-file basis, either process the file or skip the file if…


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Book Review – SQL Server Integration Services: Problem – Design – Solution

I usually don’t do book reviews (at least publicly, anyway), but when I find a piece of work that I really get a lot out of, I don’t mind sharing my experience. Such was the case with a book I finished recently. SQL Server 2008 Integration Services: Problem – Design – Solution is a concise guide to becoming a better…


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An Un-CATCHable Error?

I’ve been using the scripting tools in SSIS for some time, but I came across something today that I can’t quite explain.  I normally don’t posts unresolved problems on my blog, but I’m trying out a strategy suggested by my friend Lee Everest by sharing unfinished work in the hopes that my research and troubleshooting can help someone else. So…


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Alpha Split in SSIS, Redux

So I’ve discovered another benefit of being a technical blogger.  Not only do you get some kudos when you write something that helps someone else, but if you offer up a less-than-optimal solution, you’ll get some suggestions on how it can be done better.  I’ve had my share of the former, but earlier this week I experienced the latter. Last…


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SSIS Alpha Splits using the CODEPOINT() Function

A relatively common requirement in ETL processing is to break records into disparate outputs based on an alphabetical split on a range of letters.  A practical example of this would be a work queue for collections staff based on last name; records would be pulled from a common source and then separated into multiple outputs based on a the Customer…


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LEFT(), or Left Out?

So the question came up earlier today about the RIGHT() and LEFT() functions in the SSIS expression language.  Like the Transact-SQL functions, one might assume that these functions would exist in SSIS expression language to snatch a specified subset of a string.  That assumption would be only half right. Don’t go digging for a LEFT() function in the expression language,…


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PASS DBA Virtual Chapter Presentation

I got the opportunity to present to the PASS DBA Virtual Chapter today, discussing the properties and practical uses of SSIS expressions and package configurations.  Thanks to Greg Larsen and the other members of this virtual chapter for allowing me to present.  We had a good turnout, about 40 people, which is not bad for a lunchtime presentation. I’ve published…